The 7 Best Cycling Sunglasses Under $50 (Ideal for Beginners) [2021]

The Best Cycling Glasses Under $50

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This is a selection of the 7 best cycling sunglasses under $50 that I made after comparing more than 100 products available on the market.

And the overall winner? Torege TR33. Down below, I explain why I think they are the best.

In this article, you will also learn what UV filters cycling sunglasses should have to protect your eyes, how to find out if the sunglasses have the UV filter, how to choose cycling sunglasses, and much more.

Let’s dive in.


What Are the Best Cycling Sunglasses Under $50?

All cycling sunglasses in this selection provide the UV400 filter. Why is it important?

Torege TR33 Cycling Sunglasses (Best Cycling Sunglasses Under $50 Overall)

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Main features

  • 15+ colors available
  • 4 lenses included (only 1 is polarized)
  • Rubber nose pads and arm pieces
  • Flexible frame
  • Made from hypoallergenic materials

Technical specs

  • Glasses width 150 mm
  • Nose pads width 20 mm
  • Temple length 160 mm
  • UV400 filter

I believe Torege produces good price/value glasses. Their TR33 model is a perfect example. It is designed for wider faces, but they also look good on narrow faces thanks to the lens curvature.

Furthermore, they protect the eyes from the sides. You will benefit from it, especially in crosswinds. The glasses are comfortable thanks to rubber nose pads and arm pieces, so you will forget that you wear them.

You can use the TR33 for cycling and running, fishing, and other outdoor activities. Thanks to the large (15+) variety of colors, it will be easy for you to match them with your kit.

These Torege glasses come with 4 lenses (1 is polarized), so you can change them depending on the weather. Excellent value for the money!


Queshark Cycling Sunglasses (Best for Wide Faces)

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Main features

  • 13 colors available
  • 3 lenses included (only 1 is polarized)
  • Rubber arm and nose pieces
  • Unique design

Technical specs

  • Weight: 35g
  • Glasses width 170 mm
  • Nose pads width 35 mm
  • Temple length 140 mm
  • UV400 filter

These Queshark cycling sunglasses differ from the other ones in this selection. Their frame holds the lenses on the sides and the bottom. This makes their design very unique.

This also means that if you want to replace the lens (the packing contains 3, one of them is polarized), you have to pull the lens up and not down as usual with other cycling glasses.

Thanks to their design and dimensions, I would recommend these glasses for riders with a wider face and for those who like huge lenses.

I also believe you won’t have trouble choosing a color because the selection is pretty wide. It also includes models with unique colorful patterns. One of them you can see in the picture above.


Tifosi Jet Sunglasses (The Most Versatile)

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Main features

  • 4 colors available
  • Rubber arm and nose pieces
  • Suitable for a large variety of sports & activities

Technical specs

  • Weight: 28g
  • Glasses width 141 mm
  • Nose pads width 15 mm
  • Temple length 122 mm 
  • UV400 filter

If you are looking for sunglasses that you can use not only on your bicycle but also for other activities such as running, golf, tennis, etc., check the Tifosi Jet.

Their lenses are not as big as the Queshark sunglasses, for example. This makes them suitable for people that like small sunglasses.

Jet sunglasses are comfortable thanks to rubber nose pieces. The rubber also ensures they won’t slip off your face. This is very useful in hot weather or during hard efforts when you sweat more.

The packing includes a zippered shell case and cleaning bag. Their only downside is that the lenses are not polarized. However, they block the sunlight well.


You may also be interested in the selection of the Best Cycling Sunglasses that pro riders wear.


Rivbos Cycling Sunglasses (Best for Narrow Faces)

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Pros

  • 15+ colors available
  • Rubber arm pieces
  • Flexible frame
  • Compact and minimalistic design
  • Polarized

Technical specs

  • Glasses width 140 mm
  • Nose pads width 30 mm
  • Temple length 140 mm
  • UV400 filter

These Rivbos glasses are one of my favorites. First, they are pretty small, so they don’t cover half of your face yet provide enough eye protection.

Second, I like their simple design. With their simplicity, nothing can’t go wrong in terms of lenses, nose pieces, etc.

Just remember you won’t be able to exchange their lenses. But I think it is not such a big deal because they are polarized.

Yet, choose wisely what color of glasses/lenses you get. If you are not sure what type of lenses is right for you, read the lenses section.


Mamjoin Cycling Sunglasses (Best for Women)

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Main features

  • Clean minimalistic design
  • Polarized lenses
  • Rubber arm and nose pieces
  • 2 colors available

Technical specs

  • Glasses width 160 mm
  • Nose pads width 25 mm
  • Temple length 150 mm
  • UV400 filter

If you read some of my previous articles, you know I like the minimalistic design. These glasses exactly meet my style. They are super simple and compact. Yet, they provide enough eye protection.

When I compared them to the other glasses in this selection, I believe these will be popular among women. I noticed that women don’t like huge cycling glasses and prefer smaller ones.

The glasses are comfortable to wear thanks to nose pads and thin arm pieces so that they won’t push you behind your ears. Their main downside is a limited color selection.


Torege TR002 Cycling Sunglasses

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Main features

  • 10 colors available
  • 3 lenses included (only 1 is polarized)
  • Rubber arm & nose pieces

Technical specs

  • Glasses width 150 mm
  • Temple length 123 mm
  • UV400 filter

The lens of these Torege glasses is low but wide. Thanks to it, they don’t look too huge when you put them on, yet they provide good protection.

The TR002 glasses are popular not only among cyclists but also among drivers, fishers, and runners. It is especially thanks to their design that is more neutral and not so “cycling” oriented.

Remember, only one of the three lenses is polarized. And by the way, if you are curious whether others will see your eyes – yes, they will unless you use the mirrored lens.


Duduma Sunglasses (Best Non-Cycling Glasses for Cycling)

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Main features

  • 9 colors available
  • Small frame and lenses
  • Polarized

Technical specs

  • Weight: 24g
  • Glasses width 140 mm
  • Nose pads width 30 mm
  • Temple length 140 mm
  • UV400 filter

These Duduma glasses are the exact opposite of Cool Change glasses. They are tiny. You may even think they are too small for cycling. Yet, they are perfect for people with narrow faces.

Furthermore, you can use them when driving, during your outdoor activities, etc., and still, keep a ‘neutral’ style because you won’t wear cycling glasses that are too huge.

The Duduma TR8116 glasses are super lightweight (they weigh only 24g), so you almost forget that you wear them. Their main downside is they have irreplaceable lenses because the frame and the nose pieces are not rubber.


My Verdict

The best cycling sunglasses under $50 are the Torege TR33. They are available in plenty of color options and come with 4 lenses included from which one is polarized.

The frame is flexible so that you won’t break the glasses as easily. This is very important when cycling because sometimes you may struggle when putting them into your helmet.

I like that the materials are hypoallergenic so that you won’t experience any rash or similar problems. Of course, you don’t have to use them for cycling only and other outdoor activities like running, fishing, etc.


3 Reasons to Wear Cycling Sunglasses

Before I dive into individual cycling sunglasses features, I would like to share the 3 main reasons for using cycling glasses.

1. UV Rays and Weather Protection

Some studies have shown that UV rays can cause eye cancer (also called ocular melanoma). According to the American Cancer Society, UV rays can also cause other eye problems:

Your cornea may become inflamed or burned. The UV rays can also lead to the formation of cataracts (clouding of the eye’s lens) and tissue growth on the surface of your eye (pterygium).

The World Health Organization (WHO) also confirms the effects of UV rays on our eyes. WHO estimated that up to 20% of cataracts or 3 million per year could be due to UV exposure to the eye.

What is the conclusion, then? It pays off to invest in cycling sunglasses. But how to find out if the glasses really provide UV protection? I am going to explain that to you in the UV protection section.

2. Protection Against Insects & Dirt

There is nothing worse than riding downhill without glasses. In the best-case scenario, you start tearing. In the worst-case-scenario fly flies into your eye, you lose balance and crash.

Insects can be unpleasant even on flats. Especially in the summer months, when it is warm, and they are the most active. Personally, I don’t know many cyclists who ride without glasses. They are a must-have accessory to protect your eyes.

Even a small fly can throw you off balance. If you ride alone, it may not be such a problem. But if you ride in a group, you can endanger others if you get off your line.

PRO TIP: If you want to take off your glasses during a ride, use air vents in your bike helmet, jersey collar, or jersey pockets. Your glasses will be easily accessible in these places, so you can put them on when needed.

I am sure you will appreciate glasses also against mud and other flying particles, for example, in the forest. And if you choose the right size and fit, so your eyes will be well isolated, glasses may protect you against smaller particles like dust too.

3. Cool Look

When I was younger, one of the things I liked about professional cyclists were their glasses. Yes, their primary function is to protect your eyes, but they are also an excellent fashion accessory.

Lets Go Bike GIF by Team Cofidis - #CofidisMyTeam - Find & Share on GIPHY

If you manage to match your glasses with your helmet and jersey, you will be closer to the pro look. Also, some cycling glasses allow you to change lenses with different colors and are designed for different lighting conditions (more about the lenses below).

For example, my cycling glasses have lenses that make nature look more colorful. It is a nice side effect of wearing glasses that are primarily made to protect your eyes.


How to Choose Cycling Glasses?

Cycling sunglasses have many features that you should be aware of. Let’s briefly talk about the most important ones.

UV Protection

I am going to explain UV radiation so you better understand the importance of UV protection. There are several types of it. They differ in their wavelength.

  • UV-A (400 nm – 315 nm) – reaches Earth’s surface
  • UV-B (315 nm – 280 nm) – reaches Earth’s surface
  • UV-C (under 280 nm) – is absorbed by Earth’s atmosphere
UV radiation edited
UV radiation

UV-A and UV-B penetrate the atmosphere even in the shade or in cloudy conditions. The exposure can be as high as 90%. Sand, water, and snow can heighten the effect of up to 70 %.(Source)

Because the UV-C is absorbed by Earth’s atmosphere, you have to look for glasses that absorb the UV-A and UV-B radiation. These glasses have to have so-called UV400 filters to protect you against the negative effects I talked about before.

All of the glasses in the selection below have sufficient UV protection. So, you don’t have to worry about it.

How to Find Out If the Glasses Have UV protection?

Unless you have the glasses in person, there is no way how to test the glasses. You have to trust the seller or customer reviews of the product.

Once you get the glasses, you can either test them at home or go to a professional. The glasses are tested by a device called a photometer. It provides you with info on how effective the lenses are.

If you want to test the glasses at home, you have to have a UV flashlight and a piece of paper money, for example. Shine the flashlight onto the money through the glasses. If you see the glow of the UV-fluorescent fibers, your glasses don’t block the UV-flashlight.

How to test the UV protection quality of your glasses?

Lenses

According to the EU standard (EN 1836:2005), there are 5 basic light transmission categories of lenses. These vary in the amount of light they transmit:

CategoryLight TransmissionGlasses Usage
080-100%Interiors, night, cloudy days
143-80%Urban areas, partially cloudy (low sun exposure)
218-43%Medium sun exposure
38-18%Beaches, mountains (light reflected off sand, water, or snow)
43-8%Intense sunshine (in high mountains, glaciers, or near the sea)

You can use category 0 lenses when cycling during cloudy days and category 1 during partially cloudy days. In the summer, reach for category 2 or 3 lenses. If you ride in high mountains, use category 4 lenses.

Photochromic Lenses

Optometrist Dr. G. Heiting explains photochromic lenses in his blog post. Photochromic lenses are eyeglass lenses that are clear (or nearly clear) indoors and darken automatically when exposed to sunlight.

It isn’t easy to find glasses with photochromic lenses in a price range below $50. Their main benefit is clear – you don’t have to switch clear for dark lenses and vice versa.

The main disadvantage is that they are more expensive and it takes around 30 seconds to darken. It takes them slightly longer (2-5 minutes) to get to a clear state.

photochromic lenses
Photochromic lenses approximate transition times | Times source: onlineopticiansuk.com

Polarized Lenses

I also noticed some people mix up photochromatic and polarized lenses. A specialized website, All About Vision, explains polarized lenses as follows:

Polarized lenses are primarily used to reduce the sun’s glare. They always come in the form of sunglasses, never eyeglasses, and don’t transition back and forth.

Polarized lenses are used in sunglasses that people use for sports, including cycling, driving, and other outdoor activities.

Manufacturers of cycling sunglasses often include at least one lens that is polarized into the packing. You can find sunglasses with polarized lenses even in the lower price range.

Fit & Adjustability

Your cycling glasses must fit well. Small glasses will be uncomfortable to wear. If your glasses are too large, the wind will flow through space on the sides (especially in crosswinds). That’s why the glasses have to have a perfect fit.

The glasses’ fit is closely related to the nose pads, glasses width, and arm pieces’ length. If you buy more expensive glasses, you can adjust the nose pads.

Thanks to the nose pads, you can regulate how close the glasses will be to your eyes and how much space will be around them.

Some cycling glasses even have adjustable arm pieces. You can bend them so the glasses will hold tight behind your ears and won’t fall.

The most important glasses dimensions explained in detail
The most important glasses dimensions

Design

Design is a purely personal preference. These days, larger cycling glasses are more popular among road cyclists. It may also be thanks to the three-time world champion, Peter Sagan, who advertises a 100% brand known for its huge lenses.

Peter Sagan Cycling GIF by UCI - Find & Share on GIPHY
This is how Peter Sagan joked during the award ceremony at Paris Roubaix 2018

I am a fan of glasses that are not too large and have a simplistic design. What are your favorite glasses?? Let me know in the comments below.


Cycling Glasses Under $50 and Your Expectations

During my market research, I confirmed to myself what I had already expected. Cycling glasses up to $50 are usually not made of the highest quality materials. This means that they are more prone to damage, and they don’t last too long.

For example, I had a pair of cheap cycling glasses that lasted more than a year. Unfortunately, the rubber parts began to decompose due to sweat, so I had to invest in more expensive glasses made from better materials.

You will also not experience the so-called premium-feeling with glasses in this price range. I mean the moment when you feel that you have a premium and high-quality product in your hands.

Therefore, please keep in mind that although I put a lot of time and effort into this selection, you may always come across defective glasses. In this case, do not hesitate to contact the seller and request a replacement.


Cycling Sunglasses FAQ


This post is regularly updated to provide you with the most up to date tips on products. If you find a product that is not up to date, please, contact me.

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