Milan–San Remo Statistics: The Longest Cycling Monument in Charts (2021)

Milan-San Remo statistics

Milan–San Remo is the longest cycling Monument. Riders have to cover almost 300 km. It is also the race with the most consistent distance and route…

With more than 110 editions, we have enough data to play with to find out more about this famous, Italian classic.

Let me show you the most interesting Milan–San Remo statistics, charts, and trends that you have probably never seen yet.

Abbreviations used: MSR – Milan–San Remo, BMI – Body Mass Index

I used publicly available data from bikeraceinfo.com, wikipedia.org, procyclingstats.com, and the official Milan–San Remo website milanosanremo.it as data sources.

Please, also keep in mind the following:

  • Milan–San Remo did not take place between 1916, 1944, and 1945.
  • The actual rider’s racing weight could vary.
  • The heights and weight data are not available for all riders (especially for winners before 1945).

Milan–San Remo Distance, Time, and Average Speed

Let’s start with the basics.

Distance

The Milan–San Remo’s length is very consistent. Its average distance is 288 km, making it the longest cycling Monument. MSR exceeded the mighty 300 km mark for the first time in 2020.

The longest Milan–San Remo was 305 km long. It took place in 2020, and it was won by Belgian cyclist Wout van Aert.

The shortest Milan–San Remo was only 249 km long. It took place in 2013, and it was won by German cyclist Gerald Ciolek. This edition was shortened due to bad weather.

Milan–San Remo - Distance
Milan–San Remo – Distance

Winning Time

The following chart shows the winning time vs. the distance. Winning times fluctuate around 7h mark in the past 60 years.

The average winning time of all Milan–San Remo editions is 7h 50′ 09″.

The fastest Milan–San Remo winning time was 5h 37′ 20″. This MSR took place in 2013 and was won by Gerald Ciolek. He averaged 43.75 km/h.

The slowest Milan–San Remo winning time was 12h 44′ 09″. This MSR took place in 1917 and was won by Gaetano Belloni. He averaged 22.50 km/h.

Milan–San Remo - Winning Time vs. Distance
Milan–San Remo – Winning Time vs. Distance

Between 1907 and 1960, there was a steep downwards trend in the winning time. From 1960 to the present, it remains plus-minus the same.

Average Speed

The average speed of all Milan–San Remo editions is 37.92 km/h. The average speed increased from 31.85 km/h between 1920 and 1939 to 41.09 km/h between 1950 and 1969. The average speed between 2000 and 2019 was 42.40 km/h.

The fastest Milan–San Remo took place in 1990. The average speed of the winner, Gianni Bugno, was 45.81 km/h. He finished the 294km route in 6h 25′ 06″.

The slowest Milan–San Remo took place in 1917. The average speed of the winner, Gaetano Belloni, was 22.50 km/h. He finished the 286.5km route in 12h 44′ 09″.

Milan–San Remo - Distance and Average Speed
Milan–San Remo – Distance and Average Speed

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Milan–San Remo Height, Weight, and BMI of the Winners

Milan–San Remo winners are getting taller and lighter. Their BMI declines significantly…

Let’s now shift our focus to winners. How their height, weight, and BMI developed over time? These insights are the most unique and the most interesting.

NOTE: The heights and weight data are unavailable for all riders (especially winners before 1945).

Height of the Winners

The average height of a Milan–San Remo winner is 1.78 m.

The tallest Milan–San Remo winner ever was Wout van Aert (MSR 2020). He is 1.90 m tall.

The shortest Milan–San Remo winner ever was Emile Daems (MSR 1962). He was 1.67 m tall.

Milan–San Remo - Winner Height
Milan–San Remo – Winner Height

Weight of the Winners

The average weight of a Milan–San Remo winner is 70.9 kg.

The heaviest Milan–San Remo winner was Rik van Steenberg. He won the 1954 and 1989 MSR, weighing 83 kg.

The lightest Milan–San Remo winner was Paolo Bettini. He won the 2003 MSR, weighing just 58 kg.

Milan–San Remo - Winner Weight
Milan–San Remo – Winner Weight

BMI of the Winners

The BMI chart and trend is the most interesting part of this article, in my opinion. As a reminder, here is an explanation of BMI:

NOTE: BMI (Body Mass Index) uses your height and weight to work out if your weight is healthy. (Source)

You can interpret the BMI values using the following key:

  • Below 18.5 – underweight,
  • 18.5-24.9 – normal,
  • 25.0-29.9 – overweight,
  • 30.0 and above – obese.

So, what do we find out when we take a look at riders’ BMI?

Milan–San Remo winners have an average BMI of 22.45.

The Milan–San Remo winner with the highest BMI was Francesco Moser. He won the 1984 Milan–San Remo with a BMI of 24.39 (1.80 m, 79 kg).

The Milan–San Remo winner with the lowest BMI was Vincenzo Nibali. He won the 2018 Milan–San Remo with a BMI of 20.06 (1.80 m, 65 kg).

The BMI trend declines. MSR winners are getting taller on average. Their weight remains plus-minus the same (it decreases very gradually).

Milan–San Remo - Winner BMI
Milan–San Remo – Winner BMI

Compare yourself with pro riders. Calculate your BMI using the calculator below.

BMI CALCULATOR

System:

Weight: kg

Height: cm




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Milan–San Remo Victories

The rider with the most Milan–San Remo wins (7) is Eddy Merckx, followed by Costante Girardengo (6). Gino Bartoli and Erik Zabel both have four wins.

Milan–San Remo - Riders with the Most Victories
Milan–San Remo – Riders with the Most Victories

The most successful Milan–San Remo country is Italy (51). This is no surprise because MSR is an Italian classic.

Milan–San Remo - Countries with the Most Victories
Milan–San Remo – Countries with the Most Victories

Italy has more than twice as many wins as 2nd Belgium and three times more than 3rd France.


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Summary

These are my favorite Milan–San Remo stats:

  • The Milan–San Remo’s length is very consistent. Its average distance is 288 km, making it the longest cycling Monument. MSR exceeded the mighty 300 km mark for the first time in 2020.
  • The average winning time of all Milan–San Remo editions is 7h 50′ 09″.
  • The fastest Milan–San Remo took place in 1990. The average speed of the winner, Gianni Bugno, was 45.81 km/h. He finished the 294km route in 6h 25′ 06″.
  • The tallest Milan–San Remo winner ever was Wout van Aert (MSR 2020). He is 1.90 m tall.
  • The BMI trend declines. MSR winners are getting taller on average. Their weight remains plus-minus the same (it decreases very gradually).

What are your thoughts on the Milan–San Remo statistics? What stats do you find the most mind-blowing?

Don’t forget to also check out the statistics of other Monuments:

  1. Tour of Flanders
  2. Paris–Roubaix
  3. Liège-Bastogne-Liège
  4. Giro di Lombardia

Milan–San Remo Statistics FAQ


Sources

bikeraceinfo.com
wikipedia.org
procyclingstats.com
milanosanremo.it

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