Favero Assioma DUO Review: The Best Pedal Power Meter?

Favero Assioma DUO Review: Assioma DUO pedals in my palms

This is my Favero Assioma DUO pedal power meter review.

They belong to one of the best pedal power meters thanks to their affordable price, reliability, and consistency.

My experience, testing, and comparison with other power sources also proved it.

Depending on your budget and preference, you can either buy Favero Assioma DUO (dual-sided power meter) or Favero Assioma UNO (left-sided power meter). I fully recommend them.

Or, continue reading to learn which ones you should choose, and much more.


Who Is Favero Assioma DUO for?

Favero Assioma DUO are ideal for riders who look for an easily transferable, reliable, accurate, and consistent dual-sided power meter.

Favero Assioma UNO is a more affordable, single-sided power meter, so it estimates the power of your right leg. It also won’t provide you with an L/R balance and other advanced metrics.

The biggest disadvantages of Favero Assiomas are that they are prone to damage (as all pedal power meters), have a relatively short battery life of around 50 hrs, and are compatible with LOOK Keo cleats standard (not with Shimano) only.*

*NOTE: There are also Favero Assioma DUO-SHI spindles that convert your Shimano SPD-SL pedals into a pedal power meter. However, have a wider Q-factor of 64-65 mm.


Favero Assioma DUO Summary

Highlights

  • Most popular pedal power meters
  • Highly accurate and consistent
  • Highly reliable
  • Advanced features (L/R balance, pedal smoothness, etc.)
  • Automatic zero-offset
  • 2-year warranty

Technical Specification

  • Accuracy: ±1%
  • Claimed weight: 299g (set)
  • Measured weight: 304g (set)
  • Cleat system: LOOK Keo
  • Claimed battery life: 50h
  • Battery type: Rechargeable
  • Spindle length: 54 mm

Also available here and on wiggle.co.uk

Also available here and on wiggle.co.uk


Favero Assioma DUO Features & Benefits

Favero Assioma power meter pedals belong to one of the most popular on the market. This is mainly thanks to their reliability, affordability, accuracy, and ease of use.

I can’t comment on long-term reliability because I’ve been using them for months. However, I read many forum threads of people sharing their positive, multi-year experiences.

Assioma pedals are also much cheaper than the Garmin Rally series or SRM EXAKT. This makes them also very appealing.

Favero Assioma DUO review: The right Favero Assioma Pedal in SRAM Force crank
The right Favero Assioma DUO pedal in my SRAM Force crank

Yes, left-crank power meters like 4iiii Precision, Stages, or INPEAK POWERCRANK are even more affordable, but they are usually less accurate (about 0.5-1%) and not easily transferable between bikes.

They also won’t provide you with advanced metrics like the pedal smoothness or L/R balance and often require manual zero-offset. But it’s up to every rider to what extent they will take advantage of them.

The Favero’s IAV Cycling Dynamics metrics (like your pedal phase, seated vs. standing, etc.) are pretty cool but unfortunately available to selected Garmin head units and watches only.

Favero Assioma DUO right pedal (view from the top)
Favero Assioma DUO right pedal

Probably the biggest benefit of Favero Assioma pedals is their ease of use. They literally take a few minutes to set up. I just updated their firmware using the Assioma app, replaced the old pedals, paired them with my head unit, and I was good to go. This is something spider power meters can just dream off.


Accuracy Tests

I did multiple accuracy tests of Assioma DUO pedals indoors and outdoors.

Indoor Tests

I recorded Favero Assioma DUO data on my Wahoo ELEMNT ROAM, the Magene P505 data on my ELEMNT BOLT, and Saris H3 on indoor cycling apps (TrainerRoad, Wahoo RGT, Zwift).

Indoor Test #1 (ERG Mode)

The following chart comes from testing an ERG mode of the Saris H3 trainer. I used Favero Assioma DUO as the baseline and P505 for double-checking the results. Here is the complete dataset.

All devices, including Favero Assioma DUO pedals, ended well. No spikes or dropouts.

Magene P505 - Indoor Test 1 - power
Favero Assioma DUO – Indoor Test 1 – power

The same applies to cadence.

Magene P505 - Indoor Test 1 - cadence
Favero Assioma DUO – Indoor Test 1 – cadence

Indoor Test #2 (Freeride)

I rode the following freeride in the Wahoo RGT app. It’s the Pienza route. Assioma DUO and P505 show similar results. Unfortunately, the H3 had some issues with cadence, so the power is pretty volatile.

Magene P505 - Indoor Test 2 - power
Favero Assioma DUO – Indoor Test 2 – power

The cadence of Favero Assioma DUO and P505 is almost identical. However, H3 was off by more than 6 %.

Magene P505 - Indoor Test 2 - cadence
Favero Assioma DUO – Indoor Test 2 – cadence

Indoor Test #3 (Race)

Here I have a Zwift race. Unfortunately, the Zwift connection dropped right at the beginning for about 30 seconds. To avoid large deviations in average power due to the lack of the data from H3 from the beginning, I cropped the beginning of DUO and P505.

Magene P505 - Indoor Test 3 - power
Favero Assioma DUO – Indoor Test 3 – power

The cadence of all devices was on point.

Magene P505 - Indoor Test 3 - cadence
Favero Assioma DUO – Indoor Test 3 – cadence

Let’s now jump to the results of the outdoor tests.

Outdoor Tests

I cross-checked data from Favero Assioma DUO (recorded on Wahoo ELEMNT ROAM) and Magene P505 (recorded on Wahoo ELEMNT BOLT).

Please note that I would need a third power source that I, unfortunately, didn’t have for validating the results.

However, due to the reputation of Assioma pedals, I believe in the accuracy of the following results.

Outdoor Test #1 (Long Group Ride)

The following chart shows results from a group ride. The average power from both sources was within 1%. The empty spaces are not drops but breaks.

Magene P505 - Outdoor Test 1 - power
Favero Assioma DUO – Outdoor Test 1 – power

The cadence was also highly similar. The ‘drops’ were caused by me when I stopped pedaling.

Magene P505 - Outdoor Test 1 - cadence
Favero Assioma DUO – Outdoor Test 1 – cadence

Outdoor Test #2 (Short Solo Ride)

The following chart shows the data from my solo ride. I made multiple 30×30s high/low power efforts. P505 readings were a little bit higher than Assioma.

I noticed a drop in Favero Assioma DUO data starting at 1:02:55. I am not sure what caused it but the pedals reconnected within the 30s.

Magene P505 - Outdoor Test 2 - power
Favero Assioma DUO – Outdoor Test 2 – power

The data drop is also noticeable in the cadence. The rest of the data seems to be ok.

Magene P505 - Outdoor Test 2 - cadence
Favero Assioma DUO – Outdoor Test 2 – cadence

Favero Assioma Alternatives

The main Favero Assioma pedal power meter alternatives are:

  • Garmin Rally pedal power meters are available in 3 options XC (MTB), RS (Shimano SPD-SL), and RK (LOOK Keo). They all are available as a single-sided or dual-sided option and offer the same features but are much more expensive.
  • Wahoo POWRLINK Zero are the only power meter pedals available for the Wahoo Speedplay cleat system. They are also available in a dual-sided or single-sided option but are more expensive.
  • Any other crank arm, spider, or other types of power meters.

Favero Assioma FAQ


My Verdict

I had high expectations from Favero Assioma pedals because of their popularity and positive reviews.

My tests confirmed they earned their reputation. They are highly accurate, consistent, easy to use, and reliable.

The only complaint I have is their cleats’ compatibility. I prefer Shimano cleats to LOOK Keo. The Favero Assioma DUO-SHI (SPD SL cleats compatible) are not suitable for me due to the wider spindle width (incorrectly called Q-factor).

So, if you are not sure if you should buy Favero Assioma pedals, look no further. Whether it’s your first or next power meter, the Favero Assioma is worth it.

Also available here and on wiggle.co.uk

Also available here and on wiggle.co.uk

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